Sailors, Slaves, and Henry P. Moore

Emerging Civil War

Sailors standing next to a pivot gun on the U.S.S. Pocahontas. The Pocahontas was present at the Battle of Port Royal, and maintained the blockade of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. LOC. Sailors standing next to a pivot gun on the U.S.S. Pocahontas. The Pocahontas was present at the Battle of Port Royal, and maintained the blockade of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. LOC.

While doing some research for an upcoming post, I came across several photographs by Henry P. Moore, a New Hampshire artist who traveled to South Carolina in 1862.

Like many of his colleagues, Moore capitalized on the outbreak of the war, setting up make-shift studios for soldiers to send likenesses back home, as well as photographing specific scenes and moments in time.  Although not as famous as Matthew Brady or Alexander Gardner, whose names conjure images of battlefields littered with fallen soldiers, or of dignified looking generals, Henry Moore’s photographs capture two under-represented social classes in Civil War history: soldiers and slaves.

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Lilac Flowers – an Edible and Medicinal Treat

Fantastic Article on one of our favorite hardy plants.

Feral Botanicals - Herbs Gone Wild

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Lilac shrubs have always been one of my favorite signs of spring. Growing up in Eastern Oregon we wouldn’t see the blooms until at least May, but here in the Willamette Valley we are blessed seeing them bloom as early as the beginning of April. Vases filled with freshly cut lilac reminds me of family home and my grandmother who passed on her green thumb to my mother and on to me.

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My grandmother Vera Mezger circa 1940

Lilac or Syringa spp. (the common species is vulgaris) is in the olive family and is native to the Balkan Peninsula in Southeastern Europe. People emigrating from Europe brought the shrub to plant in their gardens in order to savor a piece of home. Here out west pioneers brought lilacs with them during the 1800’s and now you may find lilac that grows nearly wild in abandoned lots and homesteads.

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A RISAA symposium, scientists and how recreational fishermen are part of the equation

Very informative 8 hour symposium by RISAA

the fish wrap writer

Reprinted from the Narragansett Times, Wednesday, April 1st. no, it’s not a joke…

The Rhode Island Salt Water Anglers Association held their 2nd Southern New England Recreational Fishing Symposium with a goal to bring together scientists, environmentalists, regulatory agencies and recreational fishermen from several states to help identify needs and ways to encourage “An Abundant Future of Recreational Fisheries”. Co-sponsored by the Coastal Institute at the University of Rhode Island and the Pew Charitable Trusts, the meeting worked to address most specifically the recreational fisherman but the ideas suggestions and concerns raised affect all user groups of our local waters.

In her opening remarks, RI Department of Environmental Management Director Janet Coit referenced the magnificence of our state fish, the need to “celebrate the world class fisheries we have” and how her agency wants, “to ensure our children and grandchildren will be fishing in the future”.  She also mentioned…

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